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The subject of death and our own mortality are difficult topics for many people, but it’s important to talk about what happens when someone passes away without a will. It’s especially challenging when it happens to a loved one, and it’s even more challenging when they lived here in Texas. There are specific laws in…

Whether you are young or old, you might not think about estate planning, but it’s never too early to plan for the future. If you are a couple who have just start having children, or you’re kids are all grown up and out of the house you really need to think about what will happen…

Right of Privacy: Does Police Intrusion Without Search Warrant in Someone Else’s Home Violate Civil Liberties? A recent  article  in Voice For the Defense, a publication of the Texas Criminal Defense Lawyers Association highlighted an appellate case handled by Blizzard and Zimmerman attorneys Morgan Walker and Matt Zimmerman.  The article poses the question of whether…

  I wanted to talk to you about the crucial aspects to consider when hiring an appellate attorney and the kind of questions you should ask to ensure they’re the right fit for you.   Now, let me tell you, appeals are no ordinary matter. They possess a distinct nature that sets them apart from…

Navigating the complexities of a criminal case can be overwhelming, especially when you’re unsure about attorney communication and when you should expect to hear from your attorney. Here we aim to clarify the communication timeline you can expect from your legal counsel, from the moment of your arrest to the resolution of your case. The…

We do get questions from time to time about what a board certified attorney is. Here at Blizzard and Zimmerman Attorneys, Jacob Blizzard is Board Certified by the Texas Board of Specialization for not only Criminal Law but also Criminal Appellate law. These are two related but separate areas of law. He is one of…

The timeline of the 11.07 writ of habeas corpus application varies widely. From the time you file your writ to the time that you get resolution in your (or loved one’s) case could be as much as two years. It may be as little as three to four months. There are cases that resolve quickly….